Wednesday, January 06, 2010

OK, Now We’re Having Fun

Today, we continue highlighting a series of posts on Fiction Matters. Today, it’s part 3 in The History of Publishing 2010 through 2020. This post covers the year 2012 - and the focus is ebooks.

Here are some snipped highlights:
In 2012, the “remix culture” struck the textbook.

The largest technical advance, however, wasn’t the embedding of content inside a text book, but rather in the ability for users to leave comments on an abstract layer outside of a book.

A few lines of code in the start of a digital text book, and a small application installed on a tablet computer turned most eBooks into independent, distributed social networks – a global, real time, persistent, study group.

Sales of paperback books were decimated by easy access to cmmtr-enabled eBooks suited to the majority of touch tablets. The first true, public demand for eBooks had been created.
I found myself fascinated by his look at where ebooks could go in the future and urge you to link over and read it in full -- and look at the pictures of this “future” feature called “cmmtr.”
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20 comments:

  1. I don't quite understand the idea being conveyed by the books written by Buckminster Fuller. Can you make a review on his books?

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  2. Interesting article though it sounds like more bad news for authors. I also don’t know how future generations are going to know what is real and what is made up if students are able to “include dynamic content in their pirated digital text books," that they find on, YouTube, Twitter and other not so reliable sources.

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  3. Fascinating indeed, not just that article but the whole phenomenon of what's happening in the world of literature. I'm with Jane also on "what to beleive" anymore. The internet has made it possible for anyone, regardless of credibility, to put up anything and it's hard to discern reality from bs sometimes.

    Marvin D Wilson

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  4. Let's remember... it's not an article. It's a fictionalized account of what MIGHT be possible (and actually already is possible, and has been for quite some time in most cases.)

    See http://www.thecopia.com/ for ebooks meet social media.

    Wiki-fied study aids would save a fortune over the expense of buying set texts every semester. Can't see that happening any time soon while professors are forcing their own books on students as part of the course.

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  5. I kind of like the idea. So you could have a virtual message board about your book...similar to what's on Amazon, Good Reads, etc, but it's actually part of the ebook. Very interesting!

    Elizabeth
    Mystery Writing is Murder
    Mystery Lovers’ Kitchen

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  6. You're right, Anton, it is fiction. He makes that clear, so perhaps I have not been so clear. I will try to reiterate that this historical look back at the years 2010 to 2020 is fiction.

    It is interesting, though, to look at what we have today and "see" that it could be taken to these possibilities. I'm glad someone has the imagination to envision the possibilities. I, for one, never dreamed of the things we now have in reality.

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  7. After years of publishing digging its heels in resistance to change, I really wouldn't be surprised for change to suddenly take off, faster than we'd imagine! Happy New Year to you, Helen :)

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  8. Interesting. Hmm. Wonder what it will be like then.

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  9. The author of the posts is only guessing, but what he's "predicted" so far sound feasible, which is something I would not have said twenty years ago. It seems to me that things are changing quickly.

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  10. I can't wait for this cmmtr. It makes art and literature truly democratic. Back in the early days of the Apple Mac, i started putting one of my novels into Hypercard with the idea that it would work something like this. The problem was that all the technology was in its infancy and sharing was one-way only. This will be so cool.

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  11. I'm beginning to understand how my parents must have felt when television was invented. By the way, thanks for your lovely comment on my blog about the new photo.
    Karen

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  12. Mark, sounds like technology may catch up with you.

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  13. He's certainly making it interesting...

    And did your book on gaming come out? My husband was asking about it...

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  14. There's already a high demand for e-books. Amazon sold more kindle than print books for the holidays.

    Morgan Mandel
    http://morganmandel.blogspot.com

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  15. It's not out yet, Diane. In the line-up though. I believe it was scheduled for this past December, and was in their catalog, but it's not out yet. Your husband will get a copy of it when it does come out (probably before I even get one). I turned in a list of contact info on all the people I interviewed and each one is supposed to get a copy. I wish it was out. I really want to see the cover.

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  16. Intriguing idea - what a neat concept :)

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  17. What is possible with technology is mind-boggling. Just think of what we do today that used to be science fiction. What I'm waiting for is "beam me up, Scotty" as a quick way to visit relatives across the country. LOL

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  18. Good idea, Maryann, then we could also avoid security pat downs.

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  19. Congratulations, Helen. You've won a copy of Mary Kennedy's novel, Dead Air. Please get in touch at NovelWinner@aol.com.

    Jean

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  20. Helen, great link! I went over planning to read one or two parts before going to bed, and read right through to part seven.

    @Anton: I bet the profs would create their own Wiki-fied study aids. They wouldn't pass up an opportunity to exude more knowledge.

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