Saturday, October 24, 2009

Book Review: The Lost Symbol

What’s that I hear? Cheering? Hmm. Lots of you out there apparently are happy to hear I’m not reviewing the next in the Vince Flynn series. I could have. I’ve got the next one read, but I decided to take a break and, instead, review The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown.

The Lost Symbol is a thriller. Like most thrillers, it has a lot of information in it. This book isn’t about guns and assassins. It’s more of a puzzle or scavenger hunt. Most of you have probably either read the book or seen the movie of Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code. If you have, then you know what to expect of this book. Same protagonist, different story, different city, really tight timeframe (509 pages to tell what happens in one evening), overwhelming amount of information. Certainly worth reading, especially if you want to learn about the Freemasons.

As with The Da Vinci Code, The Lost Symbol is presented with such authority, you can’t figure out what is real and what is fiction. With so much focus on the puzzle, the science, the information, the Freemasons, it was, for me, difficult to really care about the characters. But that could be because I tend to like character driven books. The Lost Symbol is more of a race against time, with an historical textbook added in.

I enjoyed the book and it was a fast read, primarily because I didn’t take time to ponder the theories put forth. I’ll definitely be going to the movie when it comes out.

~~~~~~~~~
To comply with the new FTC rules on bloggers who review books, I must tell you that I received no compensation for this review. I had to buy the book, at full price, mind you, then I had to wait for my husband to read it (it was his birthday present, after all) before I could start. Then I used my own business card as a bookmark, burned electricity, which I paid for, in the wee hours of the morning to read it, and then spent time out of my work day when I should have been working on the next book I’ve been assigned to write to instead write this review and this disclaimer or whatever it’s called. Sheesh.
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28 comments:

  1. Thanks for the review, Helen. I will be sure to get it (for Christmas?) or when the price is right at Costco...and the discaimer was pretty funny too...

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  2. Helen, thanks for the review, and for visiting my blog. Your disclaimer gave me a good morning chuckle!

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  3. I too had to wait till my husband completed it. At first I was stealing it when he wasn't home...but eventually I couldn't pry it from his hands long enough to get far.

    Glad you liked it. I really enjoyed it myself!

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  4. You have set a new bar for disclaimers!

    (and now maybe I'll read that book too)

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  5. I didn't love The Da Vinci Code the way everyone else did, so I haven't decided if I'm going to read this one or not. Glad to see you enjoyed it.

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  6. Am I mistaken, but I thought the disclaimer stuff wasn't required until December 1? Love your spin on it, btw.

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  7. Love the disclaimer, too. I read the book on my travel day to Europe. Finished it the next day. Brown's a good storyteller, for sure. Didn't love this one as much as Da Vinci Code, though.
    Karen

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  8. Love the disclaimer. TAKE that FTC!

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  9. Any disclaimer ending in a 'sheesh' works for me!

    I'm interested in the Freemasons. I'll definitely be checking this book out, if only for that reason. Thanks!

    Elizabeth
    Mystery Writing is Murder

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  10. Your review about sums up what I thought the book would be like. I will read it for sure, but will wait till it is out in paperback before I do so.
    And your disclaimer is a classic!

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  11. Joanne, you're probably right about the date for the disclaimer to take effect.

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  12. Helen, the disclaimer was priceless! I didn't know you needed one of those, thank you. I haven't reviewed any books on my blog yet, but that would seem like an important bit of information.

    Happy writing!

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  13. I did not like the daVinci Code primarily because I felt that Brown played too fast and loose with history, passing off his own theories (or, more often, blending together different strains of legends) and passing them off as history.

    The subject matter of this one could lend itself to the same thing. I'll probably read it eventually if I have to take a long plane trip at some point.

    Your disclaimer's classic!

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  14. I'm planning on reading it; I like a good yarn. I'm another fan of your disclaimer. The 'sheesh' is what makes it art.

    Elspeth

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  15. I so rarely get books given to me that I shouldn't be in any trouble with the FTC!

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  16. If we could bottle all the blogger sarcasm in these (admittedly hilarious) disclaimers, we'd have something, wouldnt' we? I just don't know quite what....

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  17. We'd probably have a whole lot of really hot air.

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  18. But *sarcastic* hot air, Helen!

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  19. Thanks for the wonderful disclaimer. Much more fun to read than the one I posted on my blog. I think I need to be more creative when it comes to telling the FTC off. LOL

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  20. Maryann, I wonder if they'll eventually make us come up with something more "standard."

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