Wednesday, March 03, 2010

Indie Presses

If you’re thinking of publishing with an independent press, you’ll want to read Publishers Weekly’s article on the indie presses that grew last year.

The fastest growing indie in 2009 was Quirk Books, launched in 2002 and staffed by 15 people. It’s biggest hit last year was Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.

Another popular indie publisher is Skyhorse Press, know as “a niche publisher that is in a lot of niches.” One of those niches is “publishing older books that have either gone out of print or had their rights revert to the author.”

Blue Apple Books, founded in 2003, maintains a backlist of more than 120 titles and focuses on readers from infant to age 10.

Morgan James has stayed in the market by moving more of its titles from hardcover to trade paperback and plans to focus, in 2010, on business and sports books.

Turner Publishing if focusing on the trade market, looking to publish titles with anational appeal.

These are some of the top indie publishers. You can go to the full article to check out more on the list, including Square One Publishers, Prufrock Press, Ulysses Press, Red Wheel Weiser Conari, and Chelsea Green Publishing. At the very end of the article, there’s a graphic showing where each publisher is located.

How many of you are with an independent press or are thinking of querying an indie?
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26 comments:

  1. I'm a really big proponent of using indie presses to grow your career.

    They're usually open to unsolicited submissions and don't mind if you're not agented.

    Starting out with a smaller publisher and learning the business means that you have more leverage later with bigger publishers.

    Plus...they put out some awesome books!

    Elizabeth
    Mystery Writing is Murder

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  2. Amen to what Elizabeth said!

    I'm with an indie press and love it. So many writers think "I gotta get an agent!" But that's the toughest path to pursue. Starting with a smaller publisher gives one the chance to grow and gain some noteriety. It's a chance to get one's foot in the door.

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  3. My novel is published by an indie press in Maine and I own a micro indie press in SC (poetry chapbooks) and from both sides of the equation, it works. I enjoy working hand in hand on my novel with my press right down to cover art and font. And in as L. Diane and Elizabeth said, it's a great way to learn the publishing industry. At my age, I didn't want to waste years seeking an agent and a publisher. They not only read manuscripts without an agent, but they also have a vested interest in each author. I think the publishing industry will follow the music industry and grow to the point the big houses won't run the entire show.

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  4. I like ggray's assessment! I'm with an indie and I know I never would've made it if I'd aimed at the big publishers.

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  5. Thank you all. I love hearing from those pubbed by indies. Your advice is very valuable.

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  6. Diversity is always important. Byker Books from the north of England are publishing one of my stories as part of an anthology this month and I'm very pleased.

    For short story writers like me I think the indies are very important.

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  7. Indies seem a great opportunity. Sometimes we're so quick to think only big house publishers, but there's so much more opportunity to consider. I like having this publishing avenue available to me as a writer, and have a proposal out to a few indies. I would be happy with any of them.

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  8. There are so many indies out there and they do publish some really great books.

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  9. Does anyone know if Indies would consider a self-published book?
    Karen

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  10. I'm published by a small independent publishing house and am perfectly satisfied.

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  11. I feel that indie presses are the future as publishing continues to change. I have stories in several different anthologies published by indie presses, although I self-published my novels.

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  12. Thanks for this. I've been looking at indie presses for a collection of short stories. It's good to have this information available, and to discover that otres have been satisfied with publishing this way.

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  13. Hi Helen,
    I've presented you with an award over at my blog for being such a valuable source of writing information.

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  14. Thanks for the list. I'm going to go over it today. I'm once again sending out query letters and every little bit helps.

    Stephen Tremp

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  15. I started out with regional presses and prefer indies because they're so easy to work with. My last novel, Diary of Murder, even has one of my photos on the cover (of this area where the plot takes place). Also, we older writers are more inclined to go with indies because the submission to publication time is so much shorter. We like to be around when the book is released. :)

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  16. I work exclusively with independent presses, Helen. It seems par for the course for illustrators like me who don't have an artist's agent. I don't mind at all, I love my publishers and what they do! I found that the smaller houses utilized their local talent a lot more, or maybe that's just Minnesota.

    I do wonder what percentage of the market that independent publishers hold. It would seem that there are more independent publishers and there are not.

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  17. The book's not even finished yet, so I haven't decided how exactly I want it to be published. But I'm bookmarking this blog post for later review in the summer when I'm sending out query letters! Thanks for this important and enlightening info, Helen!

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  18. I agree, it does seem like more and more indies are sprouting and the ones that have been around awhile are getting stronger.

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  19. I agree with all the above. The indie presses I'm working with have taught me a lot. Sure I'm still trying with the big NY boys but in the meantime my career is taking steps upward.

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  20. Interesing information. I will keep this nugget tucked somewhere safe.

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  21. Great information as usual Helen - thank you!

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  22. Very helpful information, Helen. I had not heard of some of these Indie presses, but will be checking them out. I am looking for someone to do a paperback version of my book that was out in hardcover. I am not sure I want to publish it myself, so a small indie might be the ticket.

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  23. Good luck. Let us know if you go with an indie.

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  24. Great post, Helen! I think indie publishers can be better than the bigs.

    My novel was published by a smaller house. My editor was an amazing, encouraging mentor. She spent hours with me going over my manuscript and she gave me tips about pulling income where possible (Access Copyright, etc). Love her.

    Not sure if I would have gotten the same attention elsewhere. Not only that, but I got a shot - bright green and without an agent. That was a big deal.

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  25. Thank you Jenn for telling us your experience. It sounds like you had the perfect editor and publisher!

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